When it comes to depictions of war, most Hoosiers think of writers—Ernie Pyle and his columns, or Kurt Vonnegut and Slaughterhouse-Five. But John A. Bushemi of Gary, Indiana, achieved great success by capturing World War II with his camera, until he lost his life while taking the war-time photographs he loved.
our forgotten breweries, just a few of the many highlighted in Hoosier Beer: Tapping into Indiana Brewing History.
During the 1950s and 1960s, walking down Indiana Avenue was a cultural adventure. The Indianapolis thoroughfare, sometimes referred to as just “the Avenue,” offered musical venues, restaurants, and theaters that catered to the city’s black community. 
While Elkhart, Indiana may be better known for its Amish community, this small town also carries the title for being the capital of Recreational Vehicle (RV) production in the United States. Thanks to the Hoosier spirit and...
This house may be the home of a neighbor of Lincoln, Col. William Jones, after it was expanded in latter years. Jones gave young Lincoln a job transporting lumber down the Mississippi River. During the...
Today, we celebrate the life of the great entrepreneur and philanthropist Madam C.J. Walker (1867 – 1919) who has been described as the first American self-made woman millionaire.  This...
Only in East Chicago can a homicide take place at a political fundraiser with four hundred guests just a room away and nobody see or hear a thing.
The biggest story to hit Indiana’s food scene recently has been the New York Times’ celebration of the fried chicken in the southern part of the Hoosier state. “If you see a steeple in southeastern Indiana,” wrote...
Over the last few years, Indiana politicians and educators have spent a lot of time debating pre-K—namely how to stop Hoosier kids from falling further behind and how to pay for the new programs. 
During World War II, the city of Evansville, Indiana manufactured vast amounts of armaments that were vital to the Allied victory. The city made a stunning contribution to the winning of World War II.

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